Senate Intel Asks Trump Team for Russia Docs

At least three high-profile Trump associates have been asked to fork over emails and other communications with Russians in the next step of a broad Senate Intelligence Committee investigation into Kremlin meddling in the U.S. presidential election. The requests were sent over the past 10 days, opening up a path for the committee to subpoena the information from anyone who refuses to comply. Republican Senator Richard M. Burr, chairman of the committee, said in the letters that he is prepared to force those invovled to turn over their records, if it comes to that. Roger Stone, informal adviser to the president, said he was among those who received the requests. Carter Page, Paul Manafort, and Michael Flynn also received the requests, according to The New York Times. Stone told newspaper that he intended to comply with the request. “I am eager, indeed anxious, to testify in full public session, have requested no immunity and am ready to go," he said.

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The Daily Beast CHEAT SHEET
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EDITION
5
May
 
1. SUNSHINE
Senate Asks Trump Team for Russia Docs
At least three high-profile Trump associates have been asked to fork over emails and other communications with Russians in the next step of a broad Senate Intelligence Committee investigation into Kremlin meddling in the U.S. presidential election. The requests were sent over the past 10 days, opening up a path for the committee to subpoena the information from anyone who refuses to comply. Republican Senator Richard M. Burr, chairman of the committee, said in the letters that he is prepared to force those invovled to turn over their records, if it comes to that. Roger Stone, informal adviser to the president, said he was among those who received the requests. Carter Page, Paul Manafort, and Michael Flynn also received the requests, according to The New York Times. Stone told newspaper that he intended to comply with the request. “I am eager, indeed anxious, to testify in full public session, have requested no immunity and am ready to go," he said.
READ IT AT The New York Times  
 
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2. BIG LEAGUE
Colbert Hits Best Ratings Since Premiere
As conservative activists call on CBS to #FireColbert, the network reports that The Late Show with Stephen Colbert has just scored its best overnight rating since the week the show premiere in September 2015. Thursday night’s episode scored a 2.5 rating, far surpassing NBC’s Tonight Show with Jimmy Fallon, which came in at 1.9. According to CBS, this number marked a 19% increase from the previous Thursday and a 32% bump from the same night last year. The host briefly addressed the controversy over his joke, which implied a sexual relationship between President Trump and Vladimir Putin, on Wednesday night’s show. While he said he does not “regret" making the joke, Colbert said that if he could do it over, “I would change a few words that were cruder than they needed to be. Now I’m not going to repeat the phrase, but I just want to say, for the record, life is short, and anybody who expresses their love for another person in their own way, is to me, an American hero." — Matt Wilstein
 
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3. ANOTHER ONE
Trump’s Second Army Sec Pick Withdraws
Tennessee State Sen. Mark Green on Friday withdrew his nomination to be President Trump’s secretary of the Army, citing “false and misleading attacks" against him for his often incendiary comments on LGBTQ rights, evolution, and Muslims. Green has come under considerable fire by advocacy groups and political figures, both left and right, for his comments such as claiming that opposing transgender equality is part of his personal efforts to “fight evil." Green has maintained that any controversy over his remarks has been a “false attack" by liberals attempting to cut him down, and his statement declaring his withdrawal focused on that: “Tragically, my life of public service and my Christian beliefs have been mischaracterized and attacked by a few on the other side of the aisle for political gain," he wrote Friday. “While these false attacks have no bearing on the needs of the Army or my qualifications to serve, I believe it is critical to give the President the ability to move forward with his vision." Green is the second Army secretary nominee to back out of consideration; Vincent Viola did the same in February, citing difficulty in separating his business interests.
READ IT AT The Tennesseean  
 
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4. PLEDGE NIGHT
18 Charged in PSU Fraternity Death
Eighteen individuals and the Beta Theta Pi fraternity have been charged with manslaughter and furnishing alcohol to minors in the death of Timothy Piazza, a sophomore engineering student who was killed in February. At a Friday press conference, District Attorney Stacy Parks Miller said the president of the fraternity, along with other students, were charged. Piazza was reported to have fallen down a flight of stairs during pledge festivities that involved heavy drinking. Investigators said fraternity member discovered him and moved him to a couch to let him “sleep it off" and called for medical attention the next morning. Penn State officials later shut down the fraternity house. The charges were the result of a 10-week grand-jury investigation. “This has been a very intense investigation," she said. “I am not sure we have charged as many people at one time in one case." Piazza’s family was present for the announcement. “We are devastated," said Jim, his father.
READ IT AT PennLive.com  
 
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5. KEEPS GOING
Fox Accusers’ Lawyer to Testify in U.K.
A lawyer who represents 20 Fox News accusers has been invited to appear before the U.K. media regulator Ofcom, as part of hearings into 21st Century Fox’s proposed acquisition of European cable giant Sky News. “I look forward to sharing the information that I have come to learn about 21st Century Fox through the dedicated men and women that I am privileged to represent," wrote U.S. attorney Douglas Wigdor. The Guardian reported early Friday that one of the women accusing former Fox News host Bill O’Reilly in a sexual-harassment case is set to meet Ofcom officials next week. The scandal has plagued Rupert Murdoch’s media empire as it tries to take control of the part of Sky News it does not already own.
READ IT AT The Guardian  
 
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6. R.I.P.
Navy SEAL Killed in Somalia
One U.S. Navy SEAL was killed and two others were wounded Thursday in Somalia, when they were attacked by small-arms fire on a mission about 40 miles outside of Mogadishu, the Pentagon announced. The operation was against al Qaeda-linked militants in the country, officials said Friday. “U.S. forces are assisting partner forces to counter al Shabab in Somalia to degrade the al Qaeda affiliate’s ability to recruit, train, and plot external terror attacks throughout the region and in America," the U.S. Africa Command said in a statement. The wounded are said to be receiving medical attention.
READ IT AT CNN  
 
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7. BOUNCING BACK
U.S. Unemployment Hits a 10-Year Low
Job growth in the U.S. bounced back in April, according to new figures from the U.S. Department of Labor issued Friday. The numbers follow weak March results: 211,000 jobs were added last month, bringing the three-month average to 174,000. The unemployment rate ticked down to 4.4 percent from 4.5 percent, making it the lowest rate in more than 10 years. According to the report, wage gains were modest, but employers continue to complain about a shortage of employees, in particular for part-time work.
READ IT AT The New York Times  
 
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8. GET OUT
Russia Bans U.S. From Syrian No-Fly Zone
A new agreement among Russia, Turkey, and Iran in Syria will establish “de-escalation zones" closed to military aircraft from the U.S.-led coalition, said Alexander Lavrentyev, a special envoy for Russian President Vladimir Putin. The latest effort to reduce violence in the civil-war-torn country was signed Thursday, and full details have not been released. A statement from the United Nations said Secretary-General Antonio Guterres “welcomes the commitments to ceasing the use of all weapons, particularly aerial assets." Lavrentyev said “the operation of aviation in the de-escalation zones, especially of the forces of the international coalition, is absolutely not envisaged, either with notification or without. This question is closed."
READ IT AT AP  
 
 
 
 
 
 
9. OVER-SOLD
Analysts Cast Doubt on Claims About MOAB
New analysis has raised questions about the U.S. military’s use of its “mother of all bombs" in Afghanistan last month, in what was billed as a “very clear message to ISIS." The Afghan government claimed, after the April 13 bombing in Nangarhar province, that the weapon killed 94 ISIS militants and that it harmed no civilians. Now, an independent study by Alcis, an institute for geographic analysis, has raised questions about the amount of damage originally reported. Alcis studied images and ground footage of the site. It reportedly found 38 buildings and 69 trees destroyed within a 160-yard radius, contradicting various statements from local officials who had said the bomb damaged homes as far as two miles away. What’s more, the institute remained skeptical of the number of militants allegedly killed. “I’m staggered by that," said Managing Director Richard Brittan. “I simply don’t understand where they can get that number from."
READ IT AT The Guardian  
 
 
 
 
 
 
10. BLACK OPS
N. Korea: CIA Plot to Kill Kim Jong Un
North Korean state media has accused the CIA of hatching a “vicious plot" with South Korea to assassinate Kim Jong Un via “biochemical substances." Pyongyang officials said the two have a plan to kill off the young leader during a public ceremony. “We will ferret out and mercilessly destroy to the last one the terrorists of the U.S. CIA and the puppet IS [intelligence service] of South Korea," a statement said. The plot is essentially a “declaration of a war," it said. “The heinous crime, which was recently uncovered and smashed in the DPRK, is a kind of terrorism against not only the DPRK but the justice and conscience of humankind and an act of mangling the future of humankind." State media reported that the two countries had “corrupted" and “bribed" a North Korean citizen who had the surname Kim. The statement did not give any further information about how the alleged plot was foiled or what became of the alleged spy. The CIA has declined to comment on the allegation.
READ IT AT The Guardian   
 
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